“I would strongly advise them to be working on the second book before the first one comes out. Consign the first book to the past as quickly as possible. … Live in the present tense, not the past.” —Roddy Doyle

Originally posted Fri, Jul 22 2011.

(Source: )

Happy Endings

by Margaret Atwood

Originally posted Tue, Jul 05 2011.

John and Mary meet.
What happens next?
If you want a happy ending, try A.

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“Signing in the Waldenbooks,” by Parnell Hall — a mystery writer’s lament, in song.

Originally posted Sat, Jul 16 2011.

Originally posted Sun, Sep 18 2011.

Originally posted Sun, Sep 18 2011.

Character In Fiction

By Crawford Kilian

Originally posted Sun, May 01 2011.

Plausible, complex characters are crucial to successful storytelling. You can develop them in several ways.

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(Source: )

(Advertisement for a ball point pen via British Library)
Originally posted Sun, Aug 21 2011.

(Advertisement for a ball point pen via British Library)

Originally posted Sun, Aug 21 2011.

George Orwell's "Why I Write" →

From a very early age, perhaps the age of five or six, I knew that when I grew up I should be a writer. Between the ages of about seventeen and twenty-four I tried to abandon this idea, but I did so with the consciousness that I was outraging my true nature and that sooner or later I should have to settle down and write books…

Originally posted Sat, Jul 02 2011.

Originally posted Sun, Aug 28 2011.

Originally posted Sun, Aug 28 2011.

writingadvice:


Sounds like a great method!

No, actually. This sounds like a horrible method.
The sexes of  your characters, like so many others of their traits, inform those  characters’ thoughts, actions, speech patterns, etc. You can’t just pick up a male character, call him female, and expect him to behave exactly the same way.
It isn’t sexist. It’s realistic.
I’m not saying that your female character is in any way at all inferior to your male character.
I’m saying that your female character will probably have faced, at some point in her life, the expectation that she is somehow inferior to a male character, and that this experience affects her interactions with the other characters. It affects, more importantly, the way she views and treats herself. It is not something you can toss aside on the excuse of “political correctness.”
Sexism exists. This truth is awful, but it is also true. Pretending that it doesn’t — writing stories in which it doesn’t — lies not only to your reader, but to yourself, and your writing will suffer the consequences.
There are a thousand other ways in which men and women behave  differently — ways that have nothing to do with sexism and everything to do with innate differences. Does a man see pregnancy the way a woman does? Weight gain  and loss? Menstruation? Rape?
Again, being aware of these differences is not being sexist. It is being realistic and aware of differing opinions being rooted in fact — something that all writers need to aim for.
Originally posted Sat, Jul 09 2011

writingadvice:

Sounds like a great method!

No, actually. This sounds like a horrible method.

The sexes of your characters, like so many others of their traits, inform those characters’ thoughts, actions, speech patterns, etc. You can’t just pick up a male character, call him female, and expect him to behave exactly the same way.

It isn’t sexist. It’s realistic.

I’m not saying that your female character is in any way at all inferior to your male character.

I’m saying that your female character will probably have faced, at some point in her life, the expectation that she is somehow inferior to a male character, and that this experience affects her interactions with the other characters. It affects, more importantly, the way she views and treats herself. It is not something you can toss aside on the excuse of “political correctness.”

Sexism exists. This truth is awful, but it is also true. Pretending that it doesn’t — writing stories in which it doesn’tlies not only to your reader, but to yourself, and your writing will suffer the consequences.

There are a thousand other ways in which men and women behave differently — ways that have nothing to do with sexism and everything to do with innate differences. Does a man see pregnancy the way a woman does? Weight gain and loss? Menstruation? Rape?

Again, being aware of these differences is not being sexist. It is being realistic and aware of differing opinions being rooted in fact — something that all writers need to aim for.

Originally posted Sat, Jul 09 2011

schoollibrarians:

Story cubes!You throw them, then make up a story using the images!

Originally posted Mon, Aug 15 2011.

schoollibrarians:

Story cubes!
You throw them, then make up a story using the images!

Originally posted Mon, Aug 15 2011.

reasoningwithdana:

The The Impotence of Proofreading, by Taylor Mali

So do yourself a flavor, and follow these two Pisces of advice. 1) There is no prostitute for careful editing of your own work. No prostitute whatsoever. And 3) When it comes to proofreading, the red penis your friend.

Originally posted Wed, Jun 29 2011.

The moral: Use specific language whenever possible (i.e. ALWAYS).
Originally posted Sat, Jul 30 2011.

The moral: Use specific language whenever possible (i.e. ALWAYS).

Originally posted Sat, Jul 30 2011.

750 Words →

750 Words is an online journaling site that was built around the idea “that if you can get in the habit of writing three pages a day, it will help clear your mind and get the ideas flowing for the rest of the day.” The site’s services include wordcounts (alerting you when you’ve reached the 750 word goal), point systems (to motivate consistency, because who doesn’t love a good point system?), and daily email reminders (so you don’t forget to write each day, and you can adjust the time of day for them to be when you generally feel most creative). All in all, a handy website for keeping on-track with writing.

Originally posted Wed, Jun 01 2011.

Old school.
Originally posted Thu, Jul 28 2011.

Old school.

Originally posted Thu, Jul 28 2011.

Writing Excuses →

This podcast (specifically for genre writers) deals with every writing issue from world building to side characters to plot twists, plus being nerdily entertaining. Take a listen! I may post some of the especially useful episodes here, as I think of them, so keep an eye(/ear) out.

Originally posted Sat, Apr 23 2011.