Hi all! I’ve been pretty absent from the tumblrverse lately (thank goodness I queue’d like a maniac a couple months ago), but it turns out I’m approximately 873% more productive when I’m staying away from it.*

However, I’ve been channeling about a quarter of that newfound productivity into building a pseudo-professional author-type website, where I talk about writing things and review books and post gratuitous pictures of my library and whatnot.

So if you’re interested in any of those topics (or, um, me?), you should head over there and check it out — and if you comment that you were linked in from my tumblr, I will give you one (1) FREE virtual cookie!**

 

*I’m not a statistician or anything, but that seems a bit more causational than coincidental, so I’m choosing to stick with it.

**LIMITED TIME OFFER; ONLY VALID WHILE SUPPLIES LAST.

(Previously on Nora Procrastinates By Making Graphs)

Goodreads – the miraculous website that not only keeps track of all the books I read, but compiles them into bar graphs comparing what I read each year. After I finish a book, my second-favorite thing to do (the first, of course, being the shelving) is to watch that bar go up one book, and see if anything changes on the little pie chart of labels (see final graphic).

But the more books I added, and the more time I spent watching those little pie charts, the more they started to bother me.

For one thing, they measure by book, and not by page-count – a minor issue, until the 17-page prequel short carries as much weight as the 600+ page fantasy novel. For another, demographic labels such as “children” and “ya” are included in the mess of genre labels – madness, I say! Utter madness! And then there’s the fact that it counts each label separately. So Doctor Seuss’s Butter Battle Book (42), labeled “children,” “poetry,” and “scifi/speculative” gets three times as much pie-chart space as Wolf’s Head, Wolf’s Heart (754), labeled only “high fantasy.”

Really, is no one else bothered by this?

So, with my Mad MS Excel Skills (and a final project to procrastinate doing), I put together this crazy-ass graph! And my goodness, is it crazy. The data is divided into page numbers, ages, and six genre spaces (which can be either all the same, half-and-half, thirds, or any random combination that seems most appropriate, such as in the case of the romantic subplot) – see the bottom-left graphic. And then there’s a bunch of number-crunching. And then there are GRAPHS.

Bar graphs for the page counts of each age demographic, and then relatively-sized pie charts of all the genres within that age demographic! Ah, so beautiful. And one regular old genre graph, for posterity’s sake. Be still, my heart.

Anyway, yeah. This is what I do with my free time. Make graphs about books. And then present them on the internet! So here, internet. This is data for the first 43 books I read in 2013. ENJOY.

PS: Here’s my Goodreads profile! I write reviews about nearly every book I read. Friend me, or follow me, or whatever.

notcuddles
notcuddles:

ironinomicon:

chaosthatsquiet:

subtlelikeseabrook:

dodgerthirteen:

onlyaworkingtitle:

Actually, except for Westeros and Utopia, all of these locations are from children’s fantasy books (if we count Middle Earth for The Hobbit instead of LotR). An actual Fantasy World Map would be far larger — where’s Andor? Terre D’Ange? Avalon? D’Hara, Pern, or Homana? The abundance of other well-known and beloved fantasy worlds?
Several of these (Panem, for example) aren’t even from fantasy books at all. Do your research, people.
On the other hand, if anyone were to put together an actual fantasy world map, that would be pretty damn awesome. And huge. But mostly awesome.

Gulliver’s Travels counts as a child’s fantasy? Didn’t realize that.

Oh, that Jonathan Swift.
When he wasn’t modestly proposing eating children, he was writing for them.

Technically Pern is another planet altogether, isn’t it? I seem to recall spaceships…

someone please explain to me why “children’sfantasy” isn’t “real fantasy” i mean
i’m pretty sure
they’re still
fantasy
it doesn’t say ADULT FANTASY WORLD MAP on the top it says FANTASY WORLD and children’s fantasy is, guess what, still fantasy ohhhhhhhhhh

Yeah, it’s definitely still fantasy.
There is a lot of stuff sorta conspicuously missing though, in terms of fantasy. 
IDK this map does not speak to me, it draws too broadly from things that actually for the most part aren’t very similar and hahaha OH GOD DON’T LET WESTEROS NEAR ANY OF THE CHILDREN’S FANTASY LANDS, THEY MIGHT CROSS CONTAMINATE.  And that would be very, very bad.

I didn’t mean that children’s fantasy books don’t count as “fantasy,” but that they are a very small percentage of the genre, and not terribly representative of it as a whole. A more accurate “Fantasy World Map” would include those aforementioned locations, but they’d only take up a small corner of the planet(s).
And, as notcuddles pointed out, I really hope that Westeros would be farther away from, say, Neverland. Unless we’re interpreting Peter Pan's pirates as Iron Islanders, which would be interesting, but not very good for the Lost Boys.

notcuddles:

ironinomicon:

chaosthatsquiet:

subtlelikeseabrook:

dodgerthirteen:

onlyaworkingtitle:

Actually, except for Westeros and Utopia, all of these locations are from children’s fantasy books (if we count Middle Earth for The Hobbit instead of LotR). An actual Fantasy World Map would be far larger — where’s Andor? Terre D’Ange? Avalon? D’Hara, Pern, or Homana? The abundance of other well-known and beloved fantasy worlds?

Several of these (Panem, for example) aren’t even from fantasy books at all. Do your research, people.

On the other hand, if anyone were to put together an actual fantasy world map, that would be pretty damn awesome. And huge. But mostly awesome.

Gulliver’s Travels counts as a child’s fantasy? Didn’t realize that.

Oh, that Jonathan Swift.

When he wasn’t modestly proposing eating children, he was writing for them.

Technically Pern is another planet altogether, isn’t it? I seem to recall spaceships…

someone please explain to me why “children’sfantasy” isn’t “real fantasy” i mean

i’m pretty sure

they’re still

fantasy

it doesn’t say ADULT FANTASY WORLD MAP on the top it says FANTASY WORLD and children’s fantasy is, guess what, still fantasy ohhhhhhhhhh

Yeah, it’s definitely still fantasy.

There is a lot of stuff sorta conspicuously missing though, in terms of fantasy. 

IDK this map does not speak to me, it draws too broadly from things that actually for the most part aren’t very similar and hahaha OH GOD DON’T LET WESTEROS NEAR ANY OF THE CHILDREN’S FANTASY LANDS, THEY MIGHT CROSS CONTAMINATE.  And that would be very, very bad.

I didn’t mean that children’s fantasy books don’t count as “fantasy,” but that they are a very small percentage of the genre, and not terribly representative of it as a whole. A more accurate “Fantasy World Map” would include those aforementioned locations, but they’d only take up a small corner of the planet(s).

And, as notcuddles pointed out, I really hope that Westeros would be farther away from, say, Neverland. Unless we’re interpreting Peter Pan's pirates as Iron Islanders, which would be interesting, but not very good for the Lost Boys.

neithernora

Completely irrelevant: I made a recipe!

neithernora:

Blackberry Bars

In case you hadn’t noticed, it’s summertime. Late July, to be exact. And do you know what that means?

It means that blackberries are in season.

So, of course, I wanted to bake something with them. The dilemma, though, was finding a recipe that really did the fruit justice — not some wimpy white cake with blackberries scattered through it, not a crème brûlée with a blackberry sauce, not a health bar with all sorts of berries, but an actual blackberry dessert.

It didn’t take too many google searches for me to realize I was in uncharted territory.

Full post and recipe over here.